Submarine Underwater Logs

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1978 on board the U.S. Navy's nuclear submarine USS James Monroe 622B, Nicholas was watching his fellow crew members labor under the tedious task of calculating the corrections for the ship's under water log calibrations, Nicholas wrote a program for a faired-line curve calculation on a Tektronix Desktop Calculator. These calculations were done by hand, plotting out the numbers from the runs manually and then figuring out what the offset was and entering those into the underwater logs for correction. Doing this task took about 4 hours to complete, but with Nicholas' faired line curve program, it was reduced to just 2 minutes and with a higher degree of accuracy. Download Brochure
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Submarine Radar Contacts

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1978 onboard the same submarine, Nicholas was tasked to be a Radar operator, monitoring contacts and alerting the Officer of the Deck (OOD) of any threats by other vessels and to calculate how close they might come to the ship. Using charts, ship's speed and course, and at least two relative points from the radar, and a set of parallels, technicians were able to calculate the “closest point of approach” (CPA) of a vessel. Doing this process manually, a good radar tech could give the OOD this information in about 1 to 2 minutes. Utilizing a set of formula on a Texas Instrument TI-59 with a mag card reader, Nicholas programmed in the formula and was able to give the CPA, course, speed and time of CPA in about 10…
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